Zucchini Roll-ups with Herbed Goat Cheese and Olives

vegetarian zucchini herbed goat cheese rollups with olivesImagine you’re having guests over for dinner and you need a quick snack before the meal is ready…or you’re going to a party and you definitely want to bring something homemade, but it has to be easy…This is the perfect recipe for you. It is light, fresh, and perfect for spring. It looks classy, but takes zero effort. And in the spring and summer, you’ll likely have the ingredients on hand.

You can make these using a saute pan, but grilling the zucchini will really enhance the flavor and eye appeal.

You simply cut the zucchini into 1/2 inch thick slices, brush them with Healthy Harvest Greek Olive Oil, grill a few minutes on each side, add the goat cheese and olive mixture, roll ’em up, and voila!

Related: Read why Healthy Harvest Greek extra virgin olive oil is better

You could add your own favorite herb mixture to a plain chevre, but we took the easy road and used our local favorite Haystack Mountain goat cheese. You’ll find us next to them at the Boulder County Farmer’s Market starting April 1. We can’t wait! Local produce, friends, fresh air…What else could you ask for on a Saturday?

So grab these 3 simple ingredients at your next local market (See our Market Calendar) and let us know how these Zucchini Roll-ups with Herbed Goat Cheese and Olives turned out!

Click here to buy your raw, fermented Greek Koutsourelia Olives for this recipe.

Zucchini Roll-ups with Herbed Goat Cheese and Olives
 
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Quick and easy vegetarian appetizer that looks fancy but takes zero effort.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetizer, Vegetarian
Serves: 8-10 rolls
Ingredients
  • 1 very large or 3 small zucchini
  • Healthy Harvest Greek olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3½ oz. herbed goat cheese (We love local Haystack!)
  • 1½ oz. (about 7 or 8) kalamata olives, finely chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat grill to high heat or saute pan to medium-high.
  2. Slice a strip lengthwise from the zucchini to expose the inside of the vegetable. Discard or reserve for another use. Cut the 2 ends from the zucchini to make straight edges. Cut the zucchini lengthwise into ½-inch strips.
  3. Brush both sides of the zucchini pieces liberally with Healthy Harvest Greek olive oil. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Lay the zucchini pieces on the grill at a 45-degree angle (for more attractive grill marks). Cook until the zucchini is very tender, but not mushy, about 3 minutes per side.
  4. Remove zucchini from the grill and drape over cooling rack.
  5. Place goat cheese in a medium bowl. Stir olives into the goat cheese.
  6. Spread a layer of the goat cheese mixture onto one side of each zucchini piece. Gently roll each piece of zucchini. Serve.

 

Savory Lentil Pancakes with Olives

lentil, vegetarian recipe, gluten free

A handful of Healthy Harvest’s Greek koutsourelia olives make a great snack on their own, but adding just a few to a recipe can completely transform its flavor, making it exceptional. Plus, they’ll add a boost of healthy fats and antioxidants.

Related: Read what makes our olive unique here

I love making veggie patties. You might have seen my Spicy Lentil Veggie Burgers last summer. It’s so easy to mix together the ingredients, then leave the bowl in the fridge until you’re ready to fry them. I’ve made a ton of different varieties, but these Savory Lentil Pancakes with Olives are by far my favorite. They are great for breakfast, lunch, or dinner depending on what you pair them with.  I ate them with a side of sautéed swiss chard and loved it, but I think they would be OUTTA THIS WORLD with some Cucumber Yogurt Sauce, so I’ll have to update next time I make them.

vegetarian recipe, vegan, gluten free

This time around, I used red lentils, rinsing them, then boiling for 15 minutes. Then, I drained the cooked lentils as much as I could before adding them to a bowl with the rest of the ingredients.

Here’s where it gets fun. You mash everything together. Now, you can do this with a boring old fork, or dig right in with your hands. The mix should be a batter-like consistency. If it’s too wet to form into patties, simply mix in a little more almond flour.

This recipe is great, because it’s easily adaptable for vegans, people with gluten sensitivities, and everyone else. I used nutritional yeast, almond flour, and rice flour to help bind the mixture, but you could substitute an egg and/or breadcrumbs if you wish. (See recipe for details.)

After the mixture is well incorporated, heat a pan or griddle to just below medium-high, add a tablespoon of Healthy Harvest Greek extra virgin olive oil, and fry until golden brown as you would any other pancake.

Related: UC-Davis Find 86% of US Olive Oil Doesn’t Meet Standards

The key is to not touch or flip the cake until it’s nice and golden, so they don’t fall apart. Top with fresh herbs, a sprinkle of paprika, a couple olives, and a wedge of lemon, and voila, you have a crispy, savory, flavor-filled hashbrown of sorts that’s really good for you!

This could be a great meatless recipe to try during your lenten celebrations this spring. Comment below to let me know what you paired it with our share your pics on Instagram and tag @healthyharvests #eatrealfood
vegetarian recipe lentils gluten free vegan

Savory Lentil Pancakes with Olives
 
Author:
Serves: 8 pancakes
Ingredients
  • 1 cup red lentils, rinsed and hard pieces removed
  • 1 bunch parsley, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 Tbsps ground flax seeds + 3 Tbsps water (or one large egg)
  • 4 Tbsps nutritional yeast
  • ½ cup sliced Healthy Harvest black olives
  • ⅓ cup almond flour
  • ⅓ cup rice flour (or replace both flours with ⅔ cup breadcrumbs)
  • ¼ tsp paprika
  • ¼ tsp turmeric
  • sea salt and ground pepper, to taste
  • Healthy Harvest Greek extra virgin oil, for frying
Instructions
  1. Mix the ground flax and water in a small bowl and set aside for 5 minutes to thicken.
  2. Add lentils in a pot and cover them with water. From the moment they start boiling, let them boil for about 15 minutes and then remove from heat.
  3. Strain the lentils very well and put them in a large bowl. Start mashing them a little, using a fork.
  4. Add the rest of the ingredients, except oil.
  5. Using a fork, or your hands, start mixing the composition. It has to be sticky and easy to shape. If it’s not just add more almond flour/breadcrumbs until it has a dough-like consistency.
  6. Heat a pan with oil. Form a ball and use a spatula to flatten into a pancake on the frying pan and let it fry about 2 minutes on each side.

 

 

Lemon Olive Oil Cakes

It’s starting to feel a little like Spring, so Jonathan, the baker in our family, made these light, spongy Lemon Olive Oil cakes that will add a little sunshine to your day. Baking with heart healthy Healthy Harvest Greek olive oil will help your treats last longer and give them a fluffier texture.

And these could easily be served sweet or savory. We topped them with a lemony glaze and enjoy them alongside a cup of tea. But you could add a little time and have them as a savory side as well.

Try these for yourself and let me know what you think in the comments!

Lemon Olive Oil Cakes
 
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A light and bright olive oil cake with a hint of sweetness and lemon
Author:
Recipe type: dessert
Serves: 12 muffins
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1⅓ cups granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons grated lemon zest (from 2 lemons)
  • 2 large eggs
  • ¼ cup Healthy Harvest Greek extra virgin olive oil
  • ⅔ cup whole milk
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced fresh thyme, plus sprigs for garnish
  • For the Glaze:
  • 1½ cups confectioners' sugar
  • 2½ to 3 tablespoons lemon juice (from 1 to 2 lemons)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Instructions
  1. Position a rack in the middle of the oven; preheat to 350 degrees. Prepare the cakes: Brush 12-cup muffin pan with the melted butter. Lightly dust with flour and shake out the excess.
  2. Pulse the granulated sugar and lemon zest in a blender until combined. Add the eggs one at a time, then gradually pour in the olive oil and milk, pulsing until emulsified into a thin batter, about 30 seconds. Don't over mix or the cakes will be too puffy.
  3. Whisk 1 cup flour, the baking powder, salt and 1 teaspoon thyme in a small bowl. Add to the blender in 2 batches, pulsing lightly until just combined; stop to scrape down the sides of the blender as needed. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake until the cakes just begin to pull away from the sides of the pan and spring back when lightly touched, 22 to 25 minutes for a 12-cup muffin pan. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then loosen the sides with a small knife and invert the cakes onto a rack.
  4. Meanwhile, prepare the glaze: Whisk the confectioners' sugar, lemon juice and butter until smooth, adding more lemon juice if the mixture is too thick. Drizzle over the warm cakes and garnish with thyme sprigs.

 

How is Olive Oil Tested For Quality?

Not all olive oils are the same. From pomace to olive oil to extra virgin olive oil, US and International Standards require a variety of analyses for quality and grade. Read on for the different tests performed and how Healthy Harvest oils stack up. 

Free Fatty Acid Content is commonly called the “percent
acidity” or “free acidity percent”. High values are a rough
indicator of poor fruit quality or improper handling prior to
milling. Free acidity arises with the hydrolytic breakdown
of the oil. Free Acidity is  measured as percent (%) free
fatty acids expressed as oleic acid, the predominant fatty
acid in olive oil.

Extra virgin grade olive oil must be below 1% acidity. Healthy Harvest Greek tested at .27% acidity. Healthy Harvest True Tuscan contains .08% acidity.


Peroxide Value is a rough indicator of the amount of
primary oxidation within the oil. A high value indicates
that the olive fruit or paste was likely handled improperly.
Olive oil with high peroxide value may not keep well.
Peroxide is measured by a quantitative chemical analysis
and is expressed as milliequivalent of free oxygen per
kilogram of oil (meq O2/kg).

HH Greek: 7.95

HH True Tuscan:9.49


Ultraviolet (UV) absorbency is an indicator of oxidation,
especially in oils that have been refined. Measured with a
spectrophotometer, the value of UV light absorbance at
different wavelengths indicates the quantity of oxidized
compounds present in the oil. Pomace and refined oils
have higher values than virgin oils.

Total Phenol is the aggregate measure of polyphenol
content in the olive oil or fruit. As polyphenols are a key
antioxidant component in olive oil, Total Phenol is an
indicator of the oil’s potential shelf life, its style and
health benefits. Total Phenol in olive fruit before harvest
can help select optimal harvest time to maximize
polyphenol content in oil. Total Phenol is normally
expressed as milligram equivalent of Gallic (or Caffeic)
acid per kilogram of oil (mg/kg).

HH Greek 140 mg/kg

HH True Tuscan: 441 mg/kg

Oleuropein and Hydroxytyrosol: these two polyphenols
are the most abundant and have also been claimed to
confer the health benefits of olive oil.

Fatty Acid Composition: this is the detailed breakdown
of the fatty acids present in the oil, which may help
distinguish olive oil from other oils.

Diacylglycerols (DAGs) measure the proportion of 1,2
diacylglycerols in the oil, that decreases with storage,
overtime. It correlates inversely  with the starting FFA
content of the oil after milling.

Pyropheophytin (PPPs) are the natural products of
chlorophyl decomposition occurring during storage, and
when oil is exposed to elevated temperatures, as in
refining.

Sensory Analysis is the evaluation of an oil’s
organoleptic attributes, which are appreciated through
the senses of smell and taste. Sensory analysis is an
essential part of evaluating olive oil quality. 

HH Greek: mild, buttery, slightly grassy

HH True Tuscan: robust, peppery